Hampden-Sydney Home PageHampden-Sydney Quality Enhancement Program
Monday, October 20, 2014
INTRODUCTION
 
The 1999 Campus Plan for Hampden-Sydney College builds on 200 years of distinguished history and tradition to set the direction and to initiate the tasks for the College to launch into the 21st Century. In homage to John Luster Brinkley's distinguished and delightfully readable history of the College, this report recognizes that in undertaking the proposed actions, the College begins to record a new chapter, a third century on this Hill.

The central theme of this campus plan is development and programmatic growth. New buildings, building additions, and landscape enhancements are proposed to extend an established institutional character — a profound, vibrant genius loci or sense of place. The 1999 Campus Plan does not promulgate change per se but recognizes that change and growth of facilities need to be addressed and that more far-reaching changes will be inevitable in the coming century. It strives to clarify the essence of the campus's character, to develop design themes, and to lay the groundwork for future generations to contribute to in reasoned ways, to extend the bounds of two centuries of development.

The 1999 Campus Plan also seeks in all proposals to conserve the campus heritage of a village setting. Jefferson's idea of an "academical village" [a reference to his design at Charlottesville, often made in modern-day writings on campuses] is less a construct than a reality at Hampden-Sydney. The campus's pleasantly scaled, well-maintained buildings and landscapes hark back to another century and reinforce a humanistic scale to the focused energies of faculty and students who shape the character of a 21st Century institution.

Campus landscapes are settings for human activities, places within which to meet and engage one's academic colleagues. Thus far in the College's history, however, little focus has been brought to campus landscapes. This is not to imply they are not well developed, or are ill managed. This Campus Plan hopes to draw attention to the open spaces, to make them more than mere backdrops for buildings. At Hampden-Sydney landscapes other than the ponds and athletic fields do not have names. Where the Plan cannot formally name outdoor spaces, it does label landscapes in the hope that College will consider establishing the tradition, as a formality and as an approach to maintain and husband its valuable greenscapes.

In coming years, this academic village of finely scaled buildings and landscapes will be extended. The College's campus plan sets parameters for Hampden-Sydney to delineate and proclaim its presence as an institution of historic and dynamic distinction. — DLC+A