Hampden-Sydney Home PageHampden-Sydney Quality Enhancement Program
Friday, October 31, 2014
1. New Library
 
New Library
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High on the list of College priorities is the provision of more and better library space. The library of the future will be a combination of historic and futuristic spaces and purposes. The library will be the focus of information storage and retrieval, whether from some of the collections of rare volumes that the College now possesses, or databases, or the internet. Not only will books be kept as one source for learning (the general collection will continue to grow), but there will also be myriad ways to garner information electronically. The College plans to combine the Library and the Computing Center. What will be different about the new library building will be the range of opportunities for study and interaction. Individual carrels will be network-linked so that users can use notebook computers to gain electronic access to catalogs and databases. Group study rooms, reflective of trends and developments in business and education globally, will facilitate interactive learning and team projects, activities that cannot freely occur in a traditional open library setting. Networked instructional facilities will also be included in the new facility, both for instruction in library research and for a general instructional resource.

The American College and Research Libraries (ACRL) space analysis suggests the need for 65,300 NSF, net square feet, of useable area, an increase of nearly 30,000 useable square feet over the existing Eggleston Library. The campus plan study examined several development alternatives for the library, which included building all new space and the renovation and expansion of existing space. After consideration and assessment, the campus plan proposes reusing 12,000 NSF of space in Winston Hall, once in fact the College's library, and adding 56,000 NSF more to accommodate both the Library and Computing Center.

As Winston Hall is already occupied by academic, administrative, and student service functions, phasing of the library construction is dependent either upon the availability of new space or swing space (i.e., temporary relocation). As the College does not have vacant space anywhere, relocation of academic functions will require new construction. One potential phasing strategy would be to construct the new library space and let Winston remain as is, to be renovated after new space for fine arts could be constructed and spaces elsewhere could be renovated for the other units.

The Winston site provides the library, an essential and focal campus facility, a traditional and historic locus along the Via Sacra. It is a site that will enable both the recommended expansion of the library and its consolidation with the Computing Center and potential expansions by future generations.